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TYING A KINERMONY KILLER TUBE FLY

May 5 2017

Step 1:

 

Cut a 3mm fluorescent orange plastic tube at 2.5cm and snip a 45 degree bevel at the front of the tube mid way up. Cut a 1.8mm fluorescent orange plastic tube at 4cm and insert into the outer tube. Connect the tubes together with fluorescent orange floss at the bevel point and work back to the tag point, there

should be enough room for both your hook eye and leader knot to fit inside.

Step 2:

 

Build a tapered edge with your floss and tie in a mirage tinsel tag. Wrap the tag up the tapered edge and tie in cutting away the excess. Build a butt section with the floss tapering on both ends to make an oval shape. Whip finish and cut away the excess floss.

Step 3:

 

Start a new thread wind with 10/0 (or your preference) black thread. Take a section of light blue fluoro-fibre and begin to taper in your hands. Cut a clean edge to sit at the front of the outer tubing and tie in with plenty tight wraps to smooth the body. Add extra tapering to the tail by trimming both the left and right sides, start a third of the way along, angling your scissors in to create a long diamond or coffin shape, then taper underneath from the base up.

Step 4:

 

Tie in a piece of medium density gold french oval tinsel. Make sure to tie in underneath the tube body from the butt section all the way to the end of the outer tubing, this helps to keep the body shape even.

Step 5:

 

Tie in a piece of holographic black flatbraid. Make sure to tie in on the side of the body from the butt section to the end of the outer tubing. Wrap the braid tight and overlapping turns all the way to the front of the outer tubing and tie in at the front edge of the bevel. Cut away the excess.

Step 6:

 

Take the gold French oval tinsel and wrap diagonally up the body. Each turn should be firm and tight to the braid making 4 to 5 turns. Secure the tinsel with tight wraps at the end of the flatbraid and cut away the excess.

Step 7:

 

Take a section of banana yellow Tanuki pelt and taper in your hands to make a teardrop shape, the longest fibers should be on top. Tie in the fur at the end of the flatbraid with the length of the wing midway between the end of the tube and the end of the tail. The wing should be just wider than the body.

Step 8:

 

Take several strands of gold angel hair and tie them in at the middle of the strands. Fold them back and tie down again, this will stop the synthetic material from slipping. Pull the angel hair strands back and trim at different lengths the longest strand no longer than the wing section.

Step 9:

 

Take a medium length orange grizzly soft hen hackle and strip away the excess fibres leaving the best part of the feather where the barbs will not marry together but leaving enough space at the top to tie in. Tie in at the top of the feather and make 3 – 4 turns pulling back the fibres on each turn so as not to cross the feather over itself, secure with tight wraps and trim away the excess.

Step 10:

 

Take a section of hot orange Tanuki pelt a little thinner than the last wing and taper in your hands to create the same teardrop shape with the longest fibres on top. Tie in the fur tight up to the hackle but not on top of it, the length of the wing should creep just past the tail and should be ever so slightly slimmer than the first wing.

Step 11:

 

Take several strands of copper angel hair, fewer than the first wing and tie them in at the middle of the strands. Fold them back and tie down again to stop the material slipping.

Step 12:

 

Take a medium to long length light blue grizzly soft hen hackle and strip away the excess fibres leaving the best part of the feather, if there are some marabou strands that are uniform leave them in for extra movement. Tie in at the top of the feather and make 2 – 3 turns slightly lighter than the last hackle, pulling back the fibres on each turn so the feather won’t cross over itself, secure with tight wraps and trim away the excess.

Step 13:

 

Take a section of very soft silver fox tail or pelt long enough for the over wing. The better the quality the softer and less tangled the material. If the material is too stiff, try brushing the wing or removing some of the guard hairs. Taper in your hands and tie in tight up to the second hackle. The wing should reach the same distance as that between wing 1 and 2 for a symmetrical look, it should also appear to be the same distance past the tail as the tail is to the body. The wing should also be tied in slightly slimmer than the second wing again.

Step 14:

 

Finally select two matching jungle cock feathers, one feather from each side of the cape one curving clockwise and the other curving anticlockwise. Tie in the feathers naturally curving with the hair wing. The eye should reach to the butt section. Fold the stem of the feather back and tie down again with tight turns, this will help to stop the feathers from slipping. Whip finish and cut away the thread. With a fluorescent red floss build up a strong fat head to help push water and offer another bright target point. Finish with waterproof glue or varnish. Cut through the end of the floss head and apply another layer of glue or varnish to the end of the tube to complete.

Final Notes:

 

A 2.5cm length outer tube combined with tying on 0.5cm of the inner tube creates a total body length of around 3cm. The wing length has been tied to roughly 8cm. With a hook in place the total length from the hook to the front of the fly is roughly 4cm, specifically designed to be in the centre of the fly. This helps a light fly to be fairly balanced without the hook dragging the body down too far, if you prefer you can also add a metal cone instead of a floss head at the front to further aid in this balance. The purpose of the hook placement in the middle is also due to many fly fishers including myself believing that a salmon will mostly take a fly like this in the front or centre.

 

There are many different design types of scandi style flies varying in body length, wing length, wing density and width. My personal favourite way to tie scandi flies is slim and sparse though they may not appear this way in the tying images. When I hold up my flies to the light I want to be able to see through every part of the wing with light travelling through it. They should have a reasonable amount of sparkle but spread evenly, the wing should be almost as slim as a sunray shadow and above all else, mobile throughout the wing, tail and the hackles. This style of fly seems to cover 90% of our fishing for Baltic Salmon, though sometimes we require stiffer materials or heavy designs for fast flows and high water.

 

Scandi Fly Size recommendations:

 

1.5cm wing – no body / free swinging #14 treble hook with plastic tube guard

 

3cm wing – no body / free swinging #12 treble hook with plastic tube guard

 

4/5cm wing – 1.5cm body / free swinging #10 treble or double hook with plastic tube guard

 

6cm wing – 2cm body / #10 double hook

 

8cm wing – 3cm body / #8 double hook

 

10cm wing – 3.5/4cm body / #8 or #6 double or single hook

 

12cm wing – 4/4.5cm body / #6 or #4 double or single hook

 

15cm wing – 4.5/5cm body / #4 or #2 double or single hook

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